Vizner Bowl image from entrance to Fire and Form exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art,

Palm Beach, Florida January - March, 2003 (curated by William Warmus)

The Chronology and Bibliography of Studio Glass

by William Warmus and Beth Hylen

 

 
I hope that this is the most credible and detailed selected bibliography of studio glass on the web. If you use it, please cite the link as www.warmus.org

It was first published in my book Fire and Form, published by the Norton Museum of Art in 2003, and I am grateful that they have let me use it here. If you know of a more complete bibliography, e-mail me and I'll trade a link to it (at www@warmus.com).

For individual artist entries, scroll down to bottom of main bibliography. This list is far from complete and we hope to expand it over time.

 

 
Last update: 7-27-03 (this chronology is a work in progress). We invite comments, corrections, additions: please e-mail at www@warmus.com. Please be aware that we publish excerpts from e-mails in this bibliography. Keep them precise, concise and to the point.

The bibliography updates once or twice a year. For essays about individual studio glass artists (Littleton, Chihuly, Dailey, Tagliapietra, etc.) see the page at: Essays

 

 
 

Bibliography complied by Beth Hylen (with ongoing Warmus additions), chronology by Warmus and Hylen.

NOTES:

Books and journals are arranged by year, along with selected historical events. Chronological notes are provided to help orient the nonspecialist reader and have been chosen to complement the essay and place the artworks in this book in greater context.

The history of contemporary glass is discussed thoroughly in many of the books listed below. This chronological bibliography does not attempt to repeat their stories; instead, it provides a brief overview of larger trends and a selection of key events and details. It has been edited and interpreted to fit the limited space available.

Readers are referred to the Checklist in New Glass Review for a more complete overview of the period. Another useful resource is the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass Web site, <www.contempglass.org/index.html>, which provides information about local contemporary glass collectors’ groups and a calendar of exhibitions, as well as links to artists, galleries and museums, organizations, publications, schools, and more.

 

 

   

1940s–60s

1942

Harvey K. Littleton creates a small glass sculpture representing a nude female torso, slipcast from Vycor Multiform glass, at Corning Glass Works, Corning, New York.

1946

Glass Review (Czech), vol. 1 (1946). Continues through vol. 51 (1996); continued online at <www.glassrevue.com/>.

1957

American Craftsmen’s Council. Asilomar. New York: American Craftsmen’s Council, 1957. Report of the First Annual Conference of the American Craftsmen’s Council, June 1957, Asilomar, California. Includes discussions of glass and enamels by Edris Eckhardt, Michael Higgins, Ellamarie and Jackson Woolley, and others.

1958

Littleton melts glass in a ceramic kiln and initiates some rough blowing experiments.

Stennett-Wilson, Ronald. The Beauty of Modern Glass. London: Studio, 1958.

1959

Robert Willson works with artisans in Murano, Italy, including Fratelli Toso, to make glass sculptures within the factory setting.

Glass 1959 exhibition of modern glass at the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York.

Littleton presents findings to the Third Annual Conference of the American Craftsmen’s Council, Lake George, New York, and exhibits glass shapes he has made.

American Craftsmen’s Council. The Craftsman’s World. New York: American Craftsmen’s Council, 1959. Report of the Third Annual Conference of the American Craftsmen’s Council, June 1959, Lake George. Discussions about glass include Maurice Heaton, Michael Higgins, Harvey Littleton, Earl McCutchen, Paul Perrot, and others.

Corning Museum of Glass. Glass 1959: A Special Exhibition of International Contemporary Glass. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass, 1959.

1960

Thomas Stearns becomes guest designer for Venini Glass, Murano, Italy.

1961

  Fourth National Conference of the American Craftsmen’s Council held August 26–29 at the University of Washington, Seattle. A panel including Kenneth Wilson, curator at the Corning Museum of Glass, Paul Perrot, and Littleton considers the future possibilities of glass for craftsmen. Glass artists Michael Higgins, Edris Eckhardt, and John Burton discuss their own work. Russell Day (dalle de verre and kiln forming) and Frederic Schuler (scientist at Corning Glass Works) also take part. Many consider these the founding events of the studio glass movement.

American Craftsmen’s Council. Research in the Crafts. New York: American Craftsmen’s Council, 1961. Papers delivered at the Fourth National Conference of the American Craftsmen’s Council by Burton, Eckhardt, Day, Higgins, Littleton, Perrot, and Schuler.

1962

       Littleton holds two workshops in March and June at the Toledo Museum of Art, experimenting with melting glass in a small furnace and creating blown pieces with the help of Dominick Labino and others. These workshops made molten glass available to artists working in private studios for the first time.

    Littleton meets glassmaker Erwin Eisch in Frauenau, Germany, while making a survey of glass educational opportunities in Europe.

Polak, Ada. Modern Glass. London: Faber & Faber, 1962.

Toledo Museum of Art. Glass Workshop Report, June 1962. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1962. Texts by Harvey K. Littleton, Harvey Leafgreen, and Dominick Labino.

1963

  Littleton teaches glassblowing at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the first such class to be part of the permanent curriculum of an American university.

    Joel Philip Myers hired as director of design for Blenko Glass Co., Milton, West Virginia. He will leave in 1970 to establish a glass program at Illinois State University, Normal.

Beguin, Jean, ed. Verrerie Européene 1958–1963: catalogue de l’exposition des dons faits au Musée du Verre de la Ville de Liège par les verreries exposants. Liège: Musée du Verre, 1963.

Raban, J. Modern Bohemian Glass. Prague: Artia, 1963.

1964

  Labino plans and builds a furnace for glassblowing demonstrations at Columbia University during the World Congress of Craftsmen in New York; glassmaking demos include Littleton and his students; Erwin Eisch; and Sybren Valkema.

  Littleton holds a four-week seminar at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Marvin Lipofsky helps with demos, and Robert Fritz and Russell Day attend the seminar. They will later start glassblowing programs at American universities.

1965

  The Museum of Modern Art, New York, acquires a studio glass sculpture by Littleton.

Late 1960s–70s

  Emphasis on technology and education.

    Experimental discovery of the material through trial and error.

    Self-expression (not sales) most important.

    Male-dominated.

    Primarily hot (furnace) glass; some slumping plate glass, laminating pieces of blown forms, fusing, etc.

    Few critics; limited interest by museums and galleries.

    Equipment: furnaces, tools, glass.

    Long-standing techniques, such as the “fuming” and “feathering” popular during the Art Nouveau period, are continually reinvented and updated, even to this day.

    Part of broader international craft movement of the 1960s in which clay, fiber, wood, and metal are used for creative expression.

    Dichotomy exists between the sculptor in search of form (the “technique is cheap” attitude) vs. the craftsman striving to create a perfectly executed functional object.

1966

Toledo Museum of Art. Toledo Glass National 1–3. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1966, 1968, and 1970. A series of national competitive exhibitions for designer-craftsmen in glass. A selection was circulated by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in 1969–70 and 1970–71.

1966–67

    Sybren Valkema and Willem Heesen melt glass at Gerrit Rietveld Acadamie, The Netherlands; their glass program will officially begin in 1969.

1967

    The Czech pavilion at Expo 67 Montreal includes glass work by Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová.

    Sam Herman and William Michael Harris conduct the first glass workshop at the Royal College of Art, London.

    John Burton continues to explore lampworking, experiments with color formulas, and teaches at Pepperdine College (now University), Malibu, California. He would teach and influence many lampworkers including Suellen Fowler and Jeff Spencer.

Burton, John. Glass: Philosophy and Method, Hand-blown, Sculptured, Colored. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co., 1967.

Glassexport. Cristal de Bohême uniquement de Tchécoslovaquie: Expo 67.  Prague: Glassexport, 1967.

University of Texas at Austin, University Art Museum. First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts. Austin: University Art Museum, c. 1967. Catalogue for the exhibition held April 9–May 14, 1967. Includes works by Edris Eckhardt, Maurice Heaton, Frances Stewart Higgins, Michael Higgins, Frank L. Kulasiewicz, Dominick Labino, Marvin B. Lipofsky, Harvey K. Littleton, Richard Marquis, Earl McCutchen, Joel Philip Myers, Zora Norris, James M. Wayne, and others. Although this exhibition may indeed have been the first survey presented at the University Art Museum, it was not the first such survey to be shown in the United States.

1968

     Dale Chihuly in Italy on Fulbright Scholarship; is the first American glassblower to work at Venini.

     Asa Brant establishes the first small glassmaking studio in Sweden.

     Labino sculpture commissioned by Toledo Museum of Art.

Hammesfahr, James, and Clair I. Strong. Creative Glass Blowing. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman, 1968.

International Congress on Glass. Studies in Glass History and Design: Papers Read to Committee B Sessions of the VIII International Congress on Glass, Held in London, 1st–6th July 1968. Eds. R. J. Charleston (history), Wendy Evans (design), and A. E. Werner (scientific aspects of historical studies). Sheffield, England: Society of Glass Technology, 1970.

Labino, Dominick. Visual Art in Glass. Dubuque, Iowa: William Brown Company, 1968.

1969

    The Glasshouse is established in London by Sam Herman.

    Richard Marquis awarded a Fulbright-Hayes fellowship to work in Murano at Venini.

    Chihuly heads Rhode Island School of Design program.

    First European exhibition of studio glass, Vrij Glas, organized by Sybren Valkema for the Museum Boymans-van   Beuningen, Rotterdam.

International Commission on Glass. Eighth International Congress on Glass. Sheffield, England: Society of Glass Technology, 1969. Sponsored by the International Commission on Glass. Contains review lectures and abstracts of papers presented during seminars at Eighth International Congress on Glass in London held July 1–6, 1968. Littleton and others participate.

Lee Nordness Galleries. Harvey K. Littleton: Glass Sculpture. New York: Lee Nordness Galleries, Inc., 1969. Introduction by Tracy Atkinson.

Museum Boymans-van Beuningen. Vrij Glas: Erwin Eisch, Sam Herman, Harvey Littleton, Marvin Lipofsky. Rotterdam: Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, 1969. Text by Sybren Valkema.

1970s

    Studio glass survey exhibitions and galleries devoted to glass begin to appear.

    The studio movement creates a new industry for glassmaking-related products. Equipment, tools, and materials become increasingly available to studio artists (Kugler color rods, Norstar borosilicate colors, new furnace designs). Changes in glass composition from 475 marbles in the early 1960s to clear Coke bottles used by schools in the 1970s to West Virginia glass companies selling artists their cullet and, finally, batch companies, such as Littleton Batch Co., making glass specifically for studio glass artists.

    Paoli Clay Co. is among the first to sell glassmaker’s tools in the United States; previously tools were imported from Germany.

    Explosion of glass schools and studios in the 1970s and 1980s paves the way for a new industry of glass tools and equipment.

1970

Nordness, Lee. Objects: USA. New York: Viking Press (A Studio Book), 1970. Published in conjunction with the landmark traveling exhibition organized by S. C. Johnson Company that opened at the Smithsonian Institution in 1969. It focuses on the “new crafts movement” that elevates the “handcrafted object . . . to a new status,” including studio glass.

1971

    Habatat Gallery opens in Lathrup Village, Michigan.

     [Shannon Trudell at Habatat Gallery e-mailed us (8-7-03) to add-amend details:  Habatat Galleries opened in Dearborn, Michigan in June of 1971. Habatat was founded by Ferdinand Hampson, Linda Boone, and Tom Boone.]

     Contemporary Glass Group opens in New York City (becomes Heller Gallery in 1973).

     Pilchuck Glass Center, Seattle, established by Dale Chihuly with John Hauberg and Anne Gould Hauberg.

     Glass Art Society established; first conference held in Penland, North Carolina.

Littleton, Harvey K. Glassblowing: A Search for Form. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1971. Brief history of twentieth-century glass, composition of glass, tools, techniques, safety.

1972

     National Sculpture Conference in Lawrence, Kansas; Littleton introduces his phrase “Technique is cheap.”

    

American Glass Now. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1972. Catalogue for the traveling exhibition organized by the Toledo Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Glass of the American Crafts Council. Also shown at the Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco Museum of Art; and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

International Glass Symposium. Report on the First International Glass Symposium Held at Museum Bellerive, from June 4–9, 1972. Zürich: Museum Bellerive, 1972.

Museum Bellerive. Glas Heute: Kunst oder Handwerk? Zürich: Museum Bellerive, 1972. Catalogue for the exhibition held June 4–August 13, 1972 in conjunction with the First International Glass Symposium. Text by Erika Billeter.

1973

     Heller Gallery opens in New York City (formerly called the Contemporary Glass Group).

Glass Art Magazine (Oakland, Calif.), vol. 1 (1973). Continues through vol. 4 (1976); becomes Glass in 1977; suspends publication in 1983.

1974

Ball State University Art Gallery. Glass Works. Muncie, Ind.: Ball State University Art Gallery, 1974. Catalogue for the exhibition held October 6–31, 1974. Includes works by Henry Halem, Audrey Handler, Dominick Labino, Harvey Littleton, Tom McGlauchlin, Joel Philip Myers, Kim Newcomb, and Eriks Rudans.

Belk Art Gallery. North Carolina Glass ’74. Cullowhee, N.C.: Western Carolina University, 1974. Exhibitions and catalogues continue every two years through 1986; additional exhibitions are held in 1990 and 1995.

Flavell, Ray, and Claude Smale. Studio Glassmaking. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1974.

Kulasiewicz, Frank. Glassblowing. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1974.

1975

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery. Harvey K. Littleton: Glass Sculpture, Prints from Glass. Memphis, Tenn.: Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, 1975. Catalogue for the exhibition held March 29–April 27, 1975.

Crafts Board of the Australia Council. Glass. N.p.: Crafts Board of the Australia Council, 1975. Catalogue for the traveling exhibition of contemporary American glass by W. Bernstein, Billeci, Carpenter, Chihuly, Halem, Hoard, Lipofsky, Littleton, Marquis, Myers, and Zandhuis.

Grover, Ray, and Lee Grover. Contemporary Art Glass. New York: Crown Publishers, 1975.

Lynggaard, Finn. Glas Handbogen. Copenhagen: Clausens Forlag, 1975.

1976

Beard, Geoffrey. International Modern Glass. London: Barrie & Jenkins, 1976.

Contemporary Glass, 1976–1978. 3 vols. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass, 1976–78. Catalogues for annual competitions. Becomes New Glass Review in 1980.

Glass Art Society Newsletter (Oakland, Calif.), 1976–78. Becomes Glass Art Society Journal in 1979.

Museum Bellerive. Transparente Formen: 4 Glasmacher aus Prag. Zürich: Museum Bellerive, 1976. Catalogue for the exhibition held December 2, 1976–February 13, 1977. Includes Václav Cigler, Pavel Hlava, Stanislav Libenskcy´, František Vízner.

Museum für Kunsthandwerk. Modernes Glas aus Amerika, Europa und Japan. Frankfurt am Main: Museum für Kunsthandwerk, 1976. Catalogue for the exhibition held May 15–June 27, 1976; traveled to Staatliche Museen Preussi_scher Kulturbesitz, Berlin, August 13–September 26, 1976; and Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, October 6–November 14, 1976.

1977

Giberson, Dudley F., Jr. Joppa Glassworks Catalogue of Fact and Knowledge. Warner, N.H.: Joppa Glassworks, 1977.

Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg. Glaspreis 1977 für moderne Glasgestaltung in Europa/Coburg Glass Prize 1977 for Modern European Studio Glass/Prix de Coburg 1977 pour l’art du verre contemporain de l’Europe. Coburg, Germany: Heino Maedebach, 1977. Catalogue for first studio glass competition in Europe; planned and executed by Heino Maedebach.

Newman, Harold. An Illustrated Dictionary of Glass. London: Thames and Hudson, 1977. Includes introductory survey of glassmaking by Robert J. Charleston.

1978

Glass Studio (Portland, Ore.), no. 1 (January–February 1978); continues through no. 46 (December 1985).

Huntington Galleries. New American Glass, Focus West Virginia: Invitational Exhibition, 1978. Huntington, W.Va.: Huntington Galleries, 1978. Five catalogues were published for annual invitational exhibitions, 1978–84; each volume focuses on the work of four studio glass artists.

Japan Glass Artcrafts Association. Glass ’78 in Japan. [Tokyo]: Asahi Shinbun, 1978. Catalogue for the exhibition at Odakyu Department Store Grand Gallery, Tokyo, September 8–20, 1978; held in conjunction with the Eighth World Crafts Council Conference, Kyoto, September 11–15, 1978. The first triennial exhibition and catalogue sponsored by Japan Glass Artcrafts Association.

Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum. Americans in Glass. Wausau, Wis.: Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, 1978. Catalogue for the exhibition held December 2, 1978–January 14, 1979; three-year national tour sponsored by the Western Association of Art Museums. Subsequent catalogues published for exhibitions in 1981 and 1984; the first Americans in Glass exhibition was in 1976.

Preble, Duane, and Sarah Preble. Artforms. San Francisco: Canfield Press, 1978. Art history textbook showing glass sculpture.

1979

 

     Lino Tagliapietra, Italian maestro, teaches at Pilchuck.

Adlerová, Alena. Contemporary Bohemian Glass. Prague: Odeon, 1979.

Bruce, Jane. Glassblowing: A Manual of Basic Techniques. London: Crafts Council, 1979.

 

Corning Museum of Glass. New Glass: A Worldwide Survey. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass, 1979. Catalogue for the traveling exhibition (curated by William Warmus) presented during 1979–82 at the Corning Museum of Glass; the Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio; Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Musée des arts décoratifs, Paris; and Seibu Museum of Art, Tokyo. Introduced the American studio movement to American, European, and Japanese audiences.

Glass Art Society Journal (Oakland, Calif.), 1979–.

Stern, Rudi. Let There Be Neon. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1979. Revised and expanded edition, 1996.

Studio Glas: Pionere der Glaskunst. Eds. Charlotte von Finckenstein, Pavel Molnar, and Gundi Molnar. N.p., 1979. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Rittersaal, Barsbüttel, November 1979; Galerie L, Hamburg, December 1979; and SM Galerie, Frankfurt, February–March 1980. Includes works by Erwin Eisch, Raoul Goldoni, Pavel Hlava, Dominick Labino, Marvin Lipofsky, Harvey Littleton, Joel Philip Myers, and Sybren Valkema.

1980s

     Artists pursue narrative, political, gender issues.

     More multimedia work, combining glass with other materials (wood, metal, paint, stone).

     “Art vs. craft” debate pushes aside technical issues.

     New interest in alternatives to hot glass: pâte de verre, lampworking, kilnworking, coldworking, even microwaved glass jewelry.

     Women play increasingly prominent role.

     Art museums begin to exhibit glass in contemporary art sections, not only in decorative arts galleries.

1980

     Glass magazines flourish.

Craft and Folk Art Museum. Four Leaders in Glass: Dale Chihuly, Richard Marquis, Therman Statom, Dick Weiss. Los Angeles: Craft and Folk Art Museum, 1980. Catalogue for the exhibition held January 29–March 23, 1980.

Cummings, Keith. The Technique of Glass Forming. London: B. T. Batsford, 1980.

Elskus, Albinus. The Art of Painting on Glass. New York: Scribner, 1980.

Neues Glas/New Glass (Düsseldorf), no. 1 (April) 1980–. Four issues yearly. Published by Verlagsanstalt Handwerk. Available online at <www.glpnews.com/TP/NeuesGlas.html>.

New Glass Review, no. 1, 1980–. Published by the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York. Journal includes checklist of publications relating to glass made from 1945 to the present. Available online at <www.cmog.org/>.

New Work, no. 1 (1980). Continues through no. 38 (1989). Published by the New York Experimental Glass Workshop. Becomes Glass, published by the New York Experimental Glass Workshop/Urban Glass, in 1990.

Vízner, František. “Poznámky k pochopení jednoho vztahu.” Umení a Remesla, no. 4 (1980), pp. 9–10, ill. Relationship of glass artists to designers and craftsmen-producers. English summary.

1981

Corning Museum of Glass. Czechoslovakian Glass: 1350–1980. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass; New York: Dover, 1981. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Corning Museum of Glass and the Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague; held at the Corning Museum of Glass, May 2–November 1, 1981. Text by Dagmar Hejdová, Olga Drahtová, Jarmila Brozová, and Alena Adlerová.

Glaskunst ’81: Internationale Ausstellung zur Studioglasbewegung der Gegenwart. Kassel: Orangerie, 1981.

Lynggaard, Finn. La verrerie artisanale. Paris: Dessain et Tolra, 1981.

National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto. Contemporary Studio Glass: An International Collection. New York, Tokyo, and Kyoto: Weatherhill/Tankosha, 1981.

Voronov, Nikita, ed. Sovetskoe Khudozhestvennoe Stekloe/_Soviet Glass. Leningrad: Aurora Art Publishers, 1981.

Wagga Wagga City Art Gallery. Contemporary Australian Glass: First Wagga Wagga National Contemporary Australian Glass Exhibition. Wagga Wagga, Australia: City Art Gallery, 1981. Catalogue for the National Glass Biennial; the exhibition often traveled to other Australian cities.

1982

Art Gallery of Western Australia. International Directions in Glass Art. Perth: Australian Consolidated Industries and Art Gallery of Western Australia, 1982. Catalogue for the exhibition; toured in Australia. Texts by Robert Bell, Penelope Hunter-Stiebel, Stanislav Libenský, and Michael Esson.

Australian Association of Glass Artists (Ausglas). Dictionary of Hot Glass Circumstance. N.p.: Underdale South Australian College of Advanced Education, 1982.

Bizot, Chantal, Yvonne Brunhammer, and Jean-Luc Olivié. Verriers français contemporains: art et industrie. Paris: Musée des arts décoratifs, 1982. Catalogue for the exhibition organized for the French presentation of New Glass: A Worldwide Survey held April 2–July 5, 1982.

Castle Gallery, College of New Rochelle. Glass: Artist, Designer, Industry. New Rochelle, N.Y.: College of New Rochelle, 1982. Catalogue for the exhibition curated by Don Shepherd and Douglas Heller.

Chelsea Gallery. Dominick Labino: Glass Retrospective. Cullowhee, N.C.: Western Carolina University, 1982. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Chelsea Gallery, Hinds University Center, Western Carolina University, October 10–November 10, 1982. Text by Joan Falconer Byrd; autobiographical narrative by Labino.

Glass Now. Hamamatsu: Nihon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki Kaisha, [1982–95]. Catalogues for the traveling exhibitions organized by Takako Sano and Nihon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki Kaisha and held annually at various places in Japan.

Hokkaidoritsu Kindai Bijutsukan. World Glass Now ’82. Sapporo: Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, 1982. Catalogue for the World Glass Now Triennial exhibition; also held in 1985, 1988, 1991, and 1994.

Matcham, Jonathan, and Peter Dreiser. The Techniques of Glass Engraving. London: Batsford, 1982.

1983

     The Creative Glass Center of America, a division of Wheaton Village, Inc., is formed to provide fellowships to emerging artists working in glass.

     The Metropolitan Contemporary Glass Group, the first continuous collector’s glass group, is founded.

Cappa, Giuseppe. Cent ans d’art verrier en Europe: de l’art nouveau à l’art actuel. Brussels: Société Générale de Banque, 1983. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Société Générale de Banque, Brussels, March 24–May 20, 1983; and Banque Générale du Luxembourg, June 2–July 8, 1983.

Lundstrom, Boyd, and Dan Schwoerer. Glass Fusing. Portland, Ore.: Vitreous Publications, 1983. The authors also wrote books about advanced fusing and kilnworking techniques.

Ricke, Helmut, Jochem Poensgen, and Hans Gottfried von Stockhausen. Neues Glas in Deutschland/e_New Glass in Germany. Düsseldorf: Verlagsanstalt Handwerk, 1983. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf.

Sunderland Arts Centre. British Studio Glass. Sunderland, England: Sunderland Arts Centre, 1983. Catalogue for the exhibition touring in Scandinavia 1983–84. Text by Charles Bray.

Tucson Museum of Art. Sculptural Glass. Tucson, Ariz.: Tucson Museum of Art, 1983. 2 vols. Catalogue for the exhibition, held in connection with the Glass Art Society conference, at the Tucson Museum of Art, February 13–April 3, 1983; traveled to Owens-Illinois World Headquarters Building, Toledo, Ohio, May 15–June 30, 1983.

1984

Hampson, Ferdinand, ed. Glass: State of the Art I. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Elliot Johnston, 1984. Publication inspired by Habatat Gallery’s Twelfth Annual National Glass Invitational, Lathrup Village, Michigan, 1984.

High Museum of Art. Harvey K. Littleton: A Retrospective Exhibition. Atlanta, Ga.: High Museum of Art, 1984. Text by Joan Falconer Byrd.

Klein, Dan, and Ward Lloyd, eds. The History of Glass. London: Orbis, 1984.

Willard, David. Contemporary Glass: A Decade Apart. Boise, Idaho: Boise Gallery of Art, 1984. Catalogue for the exhibition held May 19–June 24, 1984. Preface by William Warmus. Artists included Dale Chihuly, Jon F. Clark, Dan Dailey, David R. Huchthausen, Robert Kehlmann, Marvin B. Lipofsky, Paul Marioni, Richard Marquis, Mark Peiser, Richard Posner, Narcissus Quagliata, and Michael Taylor.

Mid-1980s

     “Craft vs. art” debate heats up.

     Glass Art Society places technical articles in a separately bound journal.

     Move toward professionalism; artists concentrate on the business of running a studio and developing marketing strategies to create a stable livelihood.

     Production of technically assured, confident works.

     Greater interest in content, using glass as a contemporary sculpture medium.

     Collectors build collections based less on investment value and more on the inherent worth of the artworks. Camaraderie of collectors and friendly competition for the most beautiful artworks lead to a relatively stable market and the development of a glass community.

     Use of glass as a fine-art medium.

     Reaction against the “beauty” of glass.

     Auctions of contemporary glass begin at Sotheby’s and Christie’s.

1985

     Glass Weekend begins at Wheaton Village, Millville, New Jersey. The biennial seminar brings together leading contemporary glass artists, collectors, galleries, and museum curators.

     Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) formed; begins giving loans in 1987 to professional craftspeople suffering career-threatening emergencies.

Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg. Zweiter Coburger Glaspreis für moderne Glasgestaltung in Europa/Second Coburg Glass Prize for Modern Studio Glass in Europe/Deuxième prix de Coburg de l’art du verre contemporain en Europe. Coburg, Germany: Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, [1985]. Catalogue for the exhibition held July 14–October 13, 1985. Texts by Joachim Kruse, Minni Maedebach, and Susanne Netzer.

Patterson, Alan J. How Glass Is Made. New York: Facts on File, 1985. Children’s book introducing basic glassmaking.

1986

     Glasmuseum Ebeltoft, Denmark, founded by glass artist Finn Lynggaard for presentation of international contemporary glass.

     First annual Rakow Commission awarded by the Corning Museum of Glass. The commission is established to encourage fine glassmaking and the development of new works of art in glass.

Interglas Symposium Ceskoslovensko. Novy Bor, Czechoslovakia: Crystalex, n.d. Catalogue for both the first symposium held October 18–24, 1982, and the second held October 21–27, 1985. Text by Antonin Langhamer.

Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne. Expressions en verre: 200 sculptures contemporaines, Europe, USA, Japan. Lausanne: Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne, 1986. Catalogue for the exhibition held September 26, 1986–January 4, 1987.

Oakland Museum. Contemporary American and European Glass from the Saxe Collection. Oakland, Calif.: Oakland Museum, 1986.

Philippe, Joseph. Contemporary Western European Sculptures in Crystal and Glass, 1983–1986. Liège: Générale de Banque, 1986. Catalogue for the triennial exhibition; includes works by thirty-eight glass artists from eleven Western European countries. The 1989 exhibition will include ninety-four glass artists and firms from twenty European countries.

1987

     Dominick Labino dies (1910–1987).

     The Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG) is established for collectors of contemporary glass.

Contemporary Glass: The Collection of Jean and Hilbert Sosin: Twenty-five Years of Studio Glass. Dearborn: University of Michigan, 1987. Catalogue for the exhibition held April 3–June 15, 1987. Texts by C. Edward Wall and Davira S. Taragin.

Glasmuseum Ebeltoft. Young Glass ’87: An International Competition. Ebeltoft, Denmark: Glasmuseum Ebeltoft, 1987. Catalogue for the exhibition held July 5–September 13, 1987.

Glass Focus, no. 1, 1987–. Published by Beverly M. Copeland & Associates.

[Notes: In Fire and Form, the publisher of Glass Focus was identified as the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG). After research, we have changed the publisher as above. We have the following information from an August 19, 2003 e-mail from the publisher, Beverly Copeland:

"I have all the original copies of GF since I began it in Feb, 1987.
Beverly M. Copeland started publishing a glass-related newsletter in February, 1987. It was called the North Shore Studio Art Glass Newsletter because it began life as a local periodical for Chicago's North Shore area.  The first issue was two pages. Issues were published in April and June, and by August, 1987, the issue was 12 pages, and contained more national than local news.
With the October, 1987 issue and a more national focus, I changed the name of my publication to Glass Focus.
Also, in the fall of 1987, I was approached by Madeline Baer, a founding member of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass to ask if I would supply their members with Glass Focus. The sixth issue of what had become a bimonthly periodical was published in December, 1987.
The February, 1988 issue of Glass Focus was the first issue to have below the name Glass focus on the masthead "in association with the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass."]

 

Glass in the Environment Conference. Report on Proceedings. Ed. Michael Wigginton. London: Crafts Council, 1987. Report on Glass Today, an international conference held at the Royal College of Art, the Royal Institute of British Architects, and Pilkington Glass Ltd., London, 1986.

Philbrook Museum of Art. The Eloquent Object: The Evolution of American Art in Craft Media since 1945. Eds. Marcia Manhart and Tom Manhart. Tulsa, Okla.: Philbrook Museum of Art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1987. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Philbrook Museum of Art; travels nationally 1987–89 and to Japan 1989–90.

1988

Bloch-Dermant, Janine. Le verre en France les années 80. Paris: Les Éditions de l’Amateur, 1988.

Glasmuseum Frauenau. III. Internationales Glas-Symposium, 11.–15. Mai 1988; Internationales Glas ’88 Sonderausstellung im Glasmuseum Frauenau 15. Mai–25. Juli 1988. Frauenau, Germany: Glasmuseum, 1988. Catalogue for the third international glass symposium in Frauenau. Includes Harvey K. Littleton, “Studioglasbewegung Gestern—Heute—Morgen” [Studio glass movement yesterday—today—tomorrow]. Text in German and English.

Heineman, Ben. Contemporary Glass: A Private Collection. Chicago: Falcon II Press, 1988.

Hessisches Landesmuseum. Bildwerke in Glas: 25 Jahre New Glass in Amerika. Darmstadt: Hessisches Landesmuseum Darmstadt, 1988.

The Independent Glassblower, no. 1 (1988). Continues through no. 55 (September–November 1999). Published in West Barnet, Vermont, by D. Gruenig and B. Dugger; intended as a forum for “hot glass information exchange.”

International Exhibition of Glass Craft. The International Exhibition of Glass Craft ’88. Kanazawa, Japan: Executive Committee of the International Exhibition of Glass Craft, 1988. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Ishikawa Industrial Exhibition Hall, Kanazawa, May 1–5, 1988, in conjunction with the third International Exhibition of Glass Craft. Text in English and Japanese. This was the first time the exhibition was a juried competition; no catalogues were issued for the first two exhibitions in 1984 and 1986.

Moderne internationale Glaskunst. Ebeltoft, Denmark: Glasmuseum, 1988. A brief guide to the Glasmuseum, a private institution operated by the Collection of Modern International Glass Art.

Sano, Takako. A Decade with Studio Glass. N.p., 1988. Text in Japanese.

1989

     First overviews of studio glass movement by major publishers.

Frantz, Susanne K. Contemporary Glass: A World Survey from the Corning Museum of Glass. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1989.

Hampson, Ferdinand, ed. Glass: State of the Art II. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Elliot Johnson, 1989. Survey of the studio glass movement since 1984.

Klein, Dan. Glass: A Contemporary Art. New York: Rizzoli International, 1989.

Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne. Expressions en verre II: 140 sculptures de verre contemporaines d’artistes européens, américains, canadiens, japonais, australiens de la Collection du Musée des arts décoratifs, Lausanne. Lausanne: Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne, 1989. Catalogue for the exhibition Les univers de la transparence, June 21–September 30, 1989.

Warmus, William. The Venetians: Modern Glass, 1919–1990. New York: Muriel Karasik Gallery, 1989.

1990–2002

     Surge in art museum exhibitions and catalogues devoted to studio glass.

     Collectors lend/donate their collections to museums.

     Schools for glassmaking multiply throughout the United States and worldwide, as tracked in the Glass Art Society membership list, “Education Roster,” and the Steinert Industries Web site, <www.steinertindustries.com/>.

     Influence of Venetian and Czech glass strengthens throughout the 1990s.

     Levels of technical skill reach an apogee.

     Studio glass workshops range from one-person workshops to one person directing assistants who produce the glass; teamwork becomes an accepted procedure.

     Opening up of former Soviet-bloc countries, notably the CSSR, increases exchange of information.

     Internet resources related to contemporary glass emerge, including journals such as Glass Line at <www.hotglass.com/> (for lampworkers and other glassmakers) and Hot Bits at <ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth/> (for “molten glassworkers”); Internet books such as Robert Mickelson and Jennifer Zamboli, Mondo Fiamma: A Global Overview of Flameworked Glass Art at <www.global-flamework.com/contents.htm>; and numerous chat sites.

1990

Davenport Museum of Art. Contemporary Developments in Glass: A Season of Light. Davenport, Iowa: Davenport Museum of Art, 1990. Brochure for the exhibition held October 26–December 28, 1990. Text by Daniel E. Stetson.

Glass, no. 39, 1990–. Published by the New York Experimental Glass Workshop/Urban Glass.

Glass Fantasy: From Art Nouveau to the Present Day. Kyoto: Kyoto Shoin Co., 1990. Text by Kimihiro Kurata, Toshio Kitazawa, Masaaki Iseki, Atsushi Takeda, Kiyoshi Suzuki, and Yoriko Mizuta. Objects are part of the collections of the Kitazawa Art Museum (Art Nouveau glass) and the Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art (contemporary glass). In Japanese and English.

John Michael Kohler Arts Center. Structure and Surface: Beads in Contemporary American Art. Sheboygan, Wis.: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 1990. Catalogue for the exhibition held December 4, 1988–February 12, 1989; traveled to the Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., July 27, 1990–January 13, 1991.

Netzer, Susanne. Museum für modernes Glas/Museum of Modern Glass. Ed. Joachim Kruse. Coburg, Germany: Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, 1990. Catalogue for a collection located at the Orangerie at Schloss Rosenau, outside Coburg.

Petrová, Sylvá, and Jean-Luc Olivié, eds. Bohemian Glass: 1400–1989. Trans. Lysa Hochroth. New York: Abrams, 1990. English-language catalogue for the exhibition Verres de Bohême, 1400–1989: chefs d’oeuvre des musées de Tchécoslovaquie, organized by the Musée des arts décoratifs, Paris, and the Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, October 1989–January 1990.

Ricke, Helmut. Neues Glas in Europa/_New Glass in Europe: 50 Kunstler, 50 Konzepte/50 Artists, 50 Concepts._ Düsseldorf: Verlagsanstalt Handwerk, 1990. Catalogue for the exhibition at Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf.

1991

     The Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG) Annual Award begins, honoring an organization for its contributions to the contemporary glass movement.

Cappa, Giuseppe. L’Europe de l’art verrier: des précurseurs de l’art nouveau à l’art actuel, 1850–1990. Liège: Mardaga, 1991.

Miller, Bonnie J. Out of the Fire: Contemporary Glass Artists and Their Work. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1991. Book on Northwest glass.

Museum of Fine Arts. Collecting American Decorative Arts and Sculpture, 1971–1991. Boston, Mass.: Museum of Fine Arts, 1991. Catalogue for the exhibition held January 10–April 14, 1991. Includes studio glass by Dan Dailey as well as historical pieces. Introduction by Jonathan L. Fairbanks; texts by Edward S. Cooke Jr. and others.

Tacoma Art Museum. Glass: Material in the Service of Meaning. Tacoma, Wash.: Tacoma Art Museum; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1991. Catalogue for the exhibition held November 2, 1991–January 26, 1992. Introduction by Ginny Ruffner; texts by Ron Glowen and Kim Levin.

Tait, Hugh. Five Thousand Years of Glass. London: British Museum Press, 1991. Includes illustrations of techniques of glassmaking and decoration by William Gudenrath.

Vaudour, Catherine. Le verre: exposition internationale du verre contemporain/,International Exhibition of Contemporary Glass. Rouen: Conseil Regional de Haute-Normandie, 1991. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Espace Duchamp-Villon, Centre Saint-Sever, December 18, 1991–March 1, 1992.

1992

Borowsky, Irvin J. Artists Confronting the Inconceivable: Award Winning Glass Sculpture. Philadelphia: American Interfaith Institute, 1992.

Herman, Lloyd E. Clearly Art: Pilchuck’s Glass Legacy. Bellingham, Wash.: Whatcom Museum of History and Art, 1992. Introduction by Dale Chihuly.

Kehlmann, Robert. 20th Century Stained Glass. Kyoto, Japan: Kyoto Shoin, 1992.

Morris Museum. Glass from Ancient Craft to Contemporary Art, 1962–1992. Morristown, N.J.: Morris Museum, 1992.

1993

     The Society of Glass Beadmakers (SGB) is formed by a small group of American beadmakers brought together by an exhibition of contemporary glass bead artists at the Bead Museum in Prescott, Arizona. In the first five years, membership rises from 60 to 450. Web site: <www.isgb.org/index.shtml>.

Crafts Council of Great Britain. Contemporary British Glass. London: Crafts Council, 1993. Catalogue for the exhibition The Glass Show, a Crafts Council touring exhibition.

Halem, Henry. Glass Notes: A Reference for the Glass Artist. Kent, Ohio: Franklin Mills Press, 1993. Revised and updated editions published in 1994 and 1996.

Ricke, Helmut, ed. Neues Glas in Japan/

New Glass in Japan. Düsseldorf: Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof, Glasmuseum Hentrich, 1993. Catalogue for the traveling exhibition shown in 1993–94 at the Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof, Glasmuseum Hentrich; Museum Boymans-van Beunningen, Rotterdam; Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg; Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne; Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg.

San Francisco Craft and Folk Art Museum. Nine Decades: The Northern California Craft Movement, 1907 to the Present., San Francisco: San Francisco Craft and Folk Art Museum, 1993. Texts by Carole Austin, Ted Cohen, Dyana Curreri-Chadwick, and Kenneth Trapp. Artists include C. Fritz Dreisbach, Marvin Lipofsky, Paul Marioni, Mark McDonnell, Clifford Rainey, Ruth Tamura, and Mary White.

Schmid, Edward T. Ed’s Big Handbook of Glassblowing. Jamestown, Colo.: Glass Mountain Press, 1993. Followed by Advanced Glassworking Techniques, 1997; Beginning Glassblowing, 1998.

Taragin, Davira Spiro. Contemporary Crafts and the Saxe Collection. New York: Hudson Hills Press; Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1993.

Vaudour, Catherine. The Art of Contemporary Glass. Paris: Armand Colin, 1993.

Whitehouse, David. Glass: A Pocket Dictionary of Terms Commonly Used to Describe Glass and Glassmaking. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass, 1993.

Who’s Who in Contemporary Glass Art: A Comprehensive World Guide to Glass Artists, Craftsmen, Designers 1993/94. Munich: Joachim Waldrich Verlag, 1993.

1994

     SOFA (Sculpture Objects and Functional Art) exhibitions begin in Chicago.

DuBois, Alan. Objects and Drawings 2: Working in Other Dimensions. Little Rock, Ark.: Arkansas Arts Center Decorative Arts Museum, 1994. Catalogue for the exhibition held October 2–November 13, 1994. Text by Tony Hepburn. Includes drawings and glass by Dale Chihuly and Marvin Lipofsky.

Museum at Blackhawk. Breaking Traditions: Contemporary Artists Who Use Glass. Danville, Calif.: University of California at Berkeley Museum, 1994. Catalogue for the exhibition, curated by Marvin Lipofsky, held February 18–May 22, 1994.

SOFA Chicago: Sculpture Objects and Functional Art. Chicago: Expressions of Culture, Inc., 1994–. Catalogue for annual exhibition held three times a year, once in each of these cities: Miami, New York, and Chicago. Includes glass from many glass and craft galleries.

1995

Barovier Mentasti, Rosa. New Glass a Venezia. Venice: n.p., 1995. Texts by Barovier Mentasti and Dan Klein.

Bray, Charles. Dictionary of Glass: Materials and Techniques. London: A & C Black; Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. (2d ed., 2001.) A reference source for the small glass workshop with studio background information on the materials, processes, and techniques relating to glassmaking.

Dunham, Bandhu Scott. Contemporary Lampworking: A Practical Guide to Shaping Glass in the Flame. Prescott, Ariz.: Salusza Glassworks and Hohm Press, 1995. Includes techniques, a brief history of lampworking, properties of glass, beadmaking, use of color, annealing, health hazards, further study, suppliers. (Revised and updated editions published in 1997 and 2002.)

Galleria Marina Barovier. A Venetian Love Affaire. Venice: Galleria Marina Barovier, 1995. Catalogue for the exhibition held October 7–31, 1995. Includes Philip Baldwin, Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Monica Guggisberg, Dorothy Hafner, and Lino Tagliapietra.

Ioannou, Noris. Australian Studio Glass: The Movement, Its Makers, and Their Art. Roseville East, New South Wales: Craftsmen House, 1995.

Monroe, Michael W. The White House Collection of American Crafts. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1995. Catalogue for the exhibition at the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 28–September 4, 1995. Text by Barbaralee Diamonstein; foreword by Elizabeth Broun.

Wagga Wagga City Art Gallery. National Art Glass Collection: From the Collection of City Art Gallery Wagga Wagga. Wagga Wagga, Australia: City Art Gallery, 1995. Catalogue for the national touring exhibition Visions of Australia, covering studio glass made in Australia 1973–94. Texts by Robert Bell, Judy Le Lievre, and Noris Ioannou. Includes a list of exhibitions initiated by the City Art Gallery (1981–96).

1996

Dorigato, Attilia, and Dan Klein, eds. International New Glass: Venezia aperto vetro. Venice: Arsenale, 1996. Catalogue for the exhibition Venezia aperto vetro held in Venice September 13–November 10, 1996, at the Palazzo Ducale, Museo Correr, Ca’ Pesaro, Museo vetrario Murano, and Palazzo Franchetti. Texts by Susanne Frantz, Sylvá Petrová, Dan Klein, Helmut Ricke, Jean-Luc Olivié, and Attilia Dorigato on American, Czech, British, German, French, and Murano glass.

Layton, Peter. Glass Art. London: A & C Black; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1996.

Metropolitan Museum of Art. Studio Glass in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1996. Catalogue for the exhibition held April 8–October 6, 1996. Introduction by Jane Adlin.

Nouvel objet/nubel obuje. 6 vols. Seoul: Design House, 1996–. Variant title: NO. Each volume begins with profiles of selected artists of “object art” and concludes with articles on the subject. (Articles in vols. 1–2 are in Korean only.)

Oldknow, Tina. Pilchuck: A Glass School. Seattle: Pilchuck Glass School in association with the University of Washington Press, 1996.

Wigginton, Michael. Glass in Architecture. London: Phaidon Press Limited, 1996. Includes history and architectural context, glass technology, twentieth-century individual buildings, and appendices with technical information.

1997

     Major glass collections exhibited in art museums.

Cummings, Keith. Techniques of Kiln-formed Glass. London: A & C Black; Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

Fairbanks, Jonathan L., et al. Glass Today by American Studio Artists. Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1997.

Four Acts in Glass: Installations by Chihuly, Morris, Powers, and Vallien./ Ed. Barbara Ross. Seattle: Bryan Ohno Gallery, 1997. Catalogue for an exhibition curated by Ursula Ilse-Neuman at the American Craft Museum, New York, November 11, 1997–January 18, 1998.

Hawley, Henry H. Glass Today: American Studio Glass from Cleveland Collections. Cleveland, Ohio: Cleveland Museum of Art, 1997.

Liefkes, Reino. Glass. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1997. A history of glassware, primarily vessels and twentieth-century art glass, based on the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Lynn, Martha Drexler. Masters of Contemporary Glass: Selections from the Glick Collection. Indianapolis: Indianapolis Museum of Art; Indiana University Press, 1997.

Mann, Audrey. Recent Glass Sculpture: A Union of Ideas. Milwaukee, Wis.: Milwaukee Art Museum, 1997.

Moor, Andrew. Architectural Glass Art: Form and Technique in Contemporary Glass. New York: Rizzoli, 1997.

Museum für Glaskunst Lauscha. V. Internationales Glassymposium Lauscha. Ed. Helena Horn. Lauscha im Thüringer Wald, Germany: Museum für Glaskunst Lauscha, 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held July 23–27, 1997, in conjunction with the fifth Internationales Glassymposium Lauscha, supported and organized by the Förderkreis des Museums für Glaskunst Lauscha. (The fourth symposium in Lauscha was held in 1989; the fifth symposium should not be confused with the V. Internationales Glassympo_sium Frauenau, 1995.)

Ricke, Helmut, and Eva Schmitt. Italian Glass: Murano–Milan, 1930–1970, the Collection of the Steinberg Foundation. New York and Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof, Glasmuseum Hentrich; the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan; and other sites in Japan, 1996–98.

Stuhr, Joanne. Cálido!: Contemporary Warm Glass. Tucson, Ariz.: Tucson Museum of Art, 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Tucson Museum of Art, April 11–June 8, 1997; Mississippi Museum of Art, September 13–November 30, 1997; and Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, Wisconsin, January 9–March 20, 1999.

Taylor, Gay LeCleire. Contemporary Flameworked Glass. Millville, N.J.: Wheaton Cultural Alliance, Wheaton Village, 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held at the Museum of American Glass at Wheaton Village, May 24–October 26, 1997; Paul J. Stankard, guest curator.

1998

     Dale and Doug Anderson conceive and sponsor an annual program at the Pilchuck Glass School to introduce contemporary curators to glass as an art medium. The first session is held May 20–24, 1998.

Cappa, Giuseppe. Le génie verrier de l’Europe: témoignages de l’historicisme à la modernité, 1840–1998. Liège: Mardaga; Luxembourg: Banque Générale du Luxembourg, 1998. Glass companies and artists in Germany, Austria, Belgium, Bohemia and Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Great Britain, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, and Sweden. More coverage is devoted to firms than to individual artists. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Dorigato, Attilia, Dan Klein, and Rosa Barovier Mentasti, eds. International New Glass: Venezia aperto vetro. Milan: Electa, 1998. See also the 1996 catalogue.

Fike, Bonita. A Passion for Glass: The Aviva and Jack A. Robinson Studio Glass Collection. Detroit, Mich.: Detroit Institute of Arts, 1998.

Giberson, Dudley F., Jr. A Glassblower’s Companion: A Compilation of Studio Equipment Designs, Essays, and Glassmaking Ideas. Warner, N.H.: Joppa Press, 1998.

The Glass Skin. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Museum of Glass; Düsseldorf: Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof; Sapporo, Japan: Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, 1998. Catalogue for the exhibition held at the Corning Museum of Glass, May 16–October 18, 1998; traveled through 1999 to Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof; Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg; and three sites in Japan. Texts by Helmut Ricke, Susanne Frantz, and Yoriko Mizuta.

Herman, Lloyd E. American Glass: Masters of the Art. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in association with University of Washington Press, Seattle and London, 1998.

Knapp, Stephen. The Art of Glass: Integrating Architecture and Glass. Gloucester, Mass.: Rockport Publishers, 1998.

Kohler, Lucartha. Glass: An Artist’s Medium. Iola, Wis.: Kraus Publications, 1998.

Korach, Alice, and Kathlyn Moss. Bead Art. Waukesha, Wis.: Kalbach Publishing Co., 1998.

Lynggaard, Finn. The Story of Studio Glass: The Early Years, a Historic Documentation Told by the Pioneers. Copenhagen: Rhodos International Science and Art Publishers, 1998.

Skilled Work: American Craft in the Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American Art, 1998. Foreword by Elizabeth Brown; texts by Kenneth Trapp and Henry Risatti.

Stop Asking: We Exist. Twenty-five African-American Craft Artists. Pittsburgh, Penn.: Society for Contemporary Crafts, 1998. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Society for Contemporary Crafts, Pittsburgh; Joyce Scott, guest curator.

Vetro, no. 1, 1998–. Published by Centro Studi Vetro, Murano-Venice.

1999

Austin Museum of Art–Laguna Gloria. Holding Light: Contemporary Glass Sculpture. Austin, Tex.: Austin Museum of Art, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition held September 18–December 31, 1999.

Chambers, Karen S., and Tina Oldknow. Clearly Inspired: Contemporary Glass and Its Origins. San Francisco: Pomegranate, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition at Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, Florida.

Eleven Glass Sculptures. Corning, N.Y.: Corning Inc., 1999. Sculptures by seven contemporary glass artists designed for the Corning Inc. headquarters building. Foreword by Susanne K. Frantz.

Global Art Glass. Ed. Barbro Kamras. Borgholm, Sweden: Ölandstryckarna AB, 1999. Catalogue for the first Global Art Glass Triennial, held June 19–August 29, 1999, Borgholm, Sweden; curated by Barbro and Börge Kamras. Texts by Kiki Lundh, Susanne K. Frantz, Mailis Stensman, and Kerstin Wickman.

Jenkins Johnson Gallery. Masters of Contemporary Glass. San Francisco: Jenkins Johnson Gallery, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition, curated by Karen Jenkins-Johnson, held October 9–November 4, 1999. Text by William Warmus.

Kervin, James. More Than You Ever Wanted to Know about Glass Beadmaking. Livermore, Calif.: GlassWear Studios, 1999.

Takeda, Atsushi. Gendai garasu no hy–ogen/Expressions of Contemporary Glass. Yokohama: Yurindo Co., 1999.

Wooley, Frank E. Glass Technology for the Studio. Corning, N.Y.: The Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass, 1999.

2000

Bray, Charles. Ceramics and Glass: A Basic Technology. Sheffield, England: Society of Glass Technology, 2000.

Glasmuseum Frauenau. Internationales Glassymposium 2000: Glas im Kontext. Grafenau, Germany: Morsak-Verlag, 2000. Catalogue for an exhibition honoring the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Glasmuseum Frauenau held June 22–October 31, 2000, in connection with the symposium held June 22–25, 2000.

Il vetro progettato: architetti e designer a confronto con il vetro quotidiano [Designer glass: architects, designers, and everyday glass work]. Ed. Marco Romanelli. Milan: Electa, 2000. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Museo Correr, Venice, October 15, 2000–January 14, 2001.

Lowe Art Museum. Taking Form in Glass: Contemporary Works from the Palley Collection. Coral Gables, Fla.: Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 2000. Catalogue for the exhibition Splendor in the Glass.

Millennium Glass: An International Survey of Studio Glass. Louisville: Kentucky Art and Craft Foundation, 2000. Catalogue for the exhibition, curated by Brion Clinkingbeard, Adele Leight, and Stephen Rolfe Powell, held at Kentucky Art and Craft Foundation, April 28–July 8, 2000; Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, January 13–March 10, 2001; Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee, June 15–September 2, 2001.

Musée des arts décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne. Expressions en verre III: sculptures de verre contemporaines d’artistes européens, américains, canadiens, australiens de la Collection du Musée des arts décoratifs, Lausanne: acquisitions 1989–2000. Lausanne: Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, 2000.

Studio Glass: From the Gerard L. Cafesjian Collection. Scottsdale, Ariz.: Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, 2000. Catalogue for the exhibition held February 14–September 3, 2000. Foreword by Robert E. Knight; text by Debra L. Hopkins.

Yelle, Richard. Glass Art. Atglen, Penn.: Schiffer, 2000. A review of the work of 175 late twentieth-century artists and designers.

2001

The Glass Guide 2001: An International Directory of Galleries and Museums. Ed. Annette Rose-Shapiro. Brooklyn, N.Y.: Urban Glass, 2001.

Klein, Dan. Artists in Glass: Late 20th Century Masters in Glass. London: Mitchell Beazley, 2001.

Leier, Ray, Jan Peters, and Kevin Wallace. Contemporary Glass: Color, Light, and Form. Madison, Wis.: Guild Publishing, 2001.

Objects for Use: Handmade by Design. Ed. Paul J. Smith. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2001. Catalogue for an exhibition in the Defining Craft series held at the American Craft Museum. Texts by Smith and Akiko Busch.

Petrová, Sylvá. Czech Glass. Prague: Gallery, 2001. Preface by Stanislav Libenský. An analysis of twentieth-century Czech glass with an emphasis on the postwar period to the present.

Above: detail, Tagliapietra vase showing twisted cane work.

2002

Holsten Galleries. Five Masters of Contemporary Glass. Stockbridge, Mass.: Holsten Galleries, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held spring 2002. Includes Dale Chihuly, Marvin Lipofsky, William Morris, Tom Patti, and Lino Tagliapietra.

Nichols, Sarah C. Contemporary Directions: Glass from the Maxine and William Block Collection. Pittsburgh, Penn.: Carnegie Museum of Art; Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by and presented at the Carnegie Museum of Art, April 6–July 7, 2002; and the Toledo Museum of Art, November 21, 2003–February 15, 2004. Texts by Nichols and Davira S. Taragin.

2003

Fire and Form: The Art of Contemporary Glass. A major survey exhibition opens in January organized by The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, Florida. Curated by William Warmus. With accompanying book of same title.

 

This bibliography is based on materials found in the Rakow Research Library of the Corning Museum of Glass. Their online public catalog is expected to be available on the museum’s Web site, <www.cmog.org>, by the end of 2003.

Thanks to Audrey Handler, Sylvia Vigiletti, Sally Prasch, Bandhu Scott Dunham, Joan Falconer Byrd, Elmerina Parkman, and Paul Parkman for their thoughtful contributions and ideas.

 

Above: Libensky and Brychtova at SOFA Art Expo NYC

Bibliography of studio glass artists

Note: This selective bibliography is a start for a larger bibliography that will one day include more artists. We welcome comments and suggestions: please e-mail www@warmus.com.

Artists’ Selected Bibliographies

 

Hank Murta Adams

The Glass Skin. Corning, N.Y.: The Corning Museum of Glass, 1997, pp. 18–23.

Hank Murta Adams Sculpture. Cullowhee, N.C.: Western Carolina University, 1986. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Chelsea Gallery, Hinds University Center, Western Carolina University, September 23–October 16, 1986.

Warmus, William. “Castings: Hank Murta Adams.” Glass, no. 66 (spring 1997), pp. 34–39. Also available online at ‹www.warmus.com/hank_adams_essay_by_warmus.htm›.

Nicolas Africano

“In Context: Nicolas Africano and Amanda Pierce.” Glass, no. 52 (summer 1993), pp. 44–47.

Long, Andrew. “Openings.” Art and Antiques 21, no. 5 (May 1998), p. 32. Review of exhibition at Meyerson and Nowinski Art Associates, Seattle, through May 24, 1998.

Howard Ben Tré

Danto, Arthur C., Mary Jane Jacob, and Patterson Sims. Howard Ben Tré. New York: Hudson Hills Press, in association with Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, 1999. Published on the occasion of the traveling exhibition Howard Ben Tré: Interior/Exterior organized by the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, Arizona.

David Winton Bell Gallery and Norton Gallery of Art. Howard Ben Tré: New Work. Providence, R.I.: Brown University, 1993. Catalogue for the exhibition held at the David Winton Bell Gallery, List Art Center, Brown University, August 28–October 3, 1993; and Norton Gallery of Art, West Palm Beach, Florida, January 8–February 20, 1994. Texts by Diana L. Johnson and Donald Kuspit.

Dale Chihuly

Chihuly, Dale. Chihuly Projects. Seattle: Portland Press; New York: distributed by Harry N. Abrams, 2000. Texts by Barbara Rose and Dale Lanzone.

Kuspit, Donald B. Chihuly. 2d ed. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1998. Text by Donald Kuspit with an introduction by Jack Cowart.

Warmus, William. The Essential Dale Chihuly. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2000.

Daniel Clayman

Habatat Galleries. Daniel Clayman: Reaches. Pontiac, Mich.: Habatat Galleries, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition held November 12–27, 1999.

Kangas, Matthew. “Daniel Clayman: The Object Is the Image.” Glass, no. 75 (summer 1999), pp. 38–43, ill.

Dailey drawing in his studio. Detail below.

Dan Dailey

Dan Dailey, Linda MacNeil: Art in Glass and Metal. N.p.: Exeter Press, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition held at the Art Center in Hargate, St. Paul’s School, Concord, New Hampshire, January 15–February 12, 1999.

Riley/Hawk Galleries. Dan Dailey: Vases from the Archives, 1974–1988. Columbus, Ohio: Riley/Hawk Galleries, 1998. Texts by Karen Chambers, Peggy Gilges, and Dan Dailey.

Warmus, William, and Henry Geldzahler. Dan Dailey: Simple Complexities in Drawings and Glass, 1972–1987. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1987. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, Philadelphia College of Art, Philadelphia, February 27–March 30, 1987; traveled to Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., June 26–October 25, 1987.

Michael M. Glancy

Barry Friedman Ltd. Beyond Vessels: Recent Glass Work by Michael Glancy. New York: Barry Friedman Ltd., 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held May 1–July 11, 1997. Text by Alastair Duncan.

———. Infinite Obsessions: Maurice Marinot and Michael Glancy. New York: Barry Friedman Ltd., 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition held November 4, 1999–January 8, 2000. Text by Dan Klein.

Constellations: An Alternative Galaxy, Glass by Michael Glancy. Basel: Edition von Bartha, c. 1995. Texts by Miklos von Bartha, Dan Klein, Dale Chihuly, and Erik Bottschalk.

Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora Mace

Brunnier Gallery and Museum. Kirkpatrick/Mace. Ames, Iowa: Brunnier Gallery and Museum, Iowa State University, 1993. Catalogue for the exhibition Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace: Recent Sculpture held April 15–August 15, 1993.

Brunsman, Laura, and Ruth Askey, eds. Modernism and Beyond: Women Artists of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Midmarch Arts Press, 1993. See Margery Aronson, “Translucent and Opaque: Women and Glass,” pp. 47–58. Includes Sonja Blomdahl, Ginny Ruffner, Flora Mace, and Joey Kirkpatrick.

Chambers, Karen. “Dual Action Artistry: Flora Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick Combine Their Passions and Their Skills in an Acclaimed Partnership.” American Style 4, no. 4 (summer 1998), pp. 62–69.

Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová

Frantz, Susanne K., ed. Stanislav Libenský, Jaroslava Brychtová: A 40-Year Collaboration in Glass. Munich and New York: Prestel Verlag, 1994. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York, and the UmûleckoprÛmyslové Muzeum v Praze, Prague, and held at the Corning Museum of Glass, April 23–October 16, 1994. Texts by Thomas S. Buechner, Sylvá Petrová, and Jiri Setlik.

Kehlmann, Robert. The Inner Light: Sculpture by Stanislav Libensky´ and Jaroslava Brychtová. Seattle: University of Washington Press; Tacoma, Wash.: Museum of Glass, International Center for Contemporary Art, 2002. Published in conjunction with the exhibition held at the Museum of Glass, International Center for Contemporary Art, Tacoma, July 6–October 27, 2002.

Marvin Lipofsky

Holsten Galleries. Five Masters of Contemporary Glass. Stockbridge, Mass.: Holsten Galleries, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held in spring 2002. Includes works by Dale Chihuly, Marvin Lipofsky, William Morris, Tom Patti, and Lino Tagliapietra.

Toso Fei, Alberto. Marvin Lipofsky: un “muranese” in California/A “Muranese” in California. Murano (Venice): Centro Studio Vetro, 2000. Text in Italian and English. Also published in Vetro, no. 9 (2001).

Harvey K. Littleton

Glasmuseum Frauenau. Harvey K. Littleton zum 70. Geburtsutag 14. Juni ’92. Frauenau, Germany: Glasmuseum, 1992. Texts by Alfons Hannes and Erwin Eisch.

High Museum of Art. Harvey K. Littleton: A Retrospective Exhibition. Atlanta, Ga.: High Museum of Art, 1984. Catarlogue for the exhibition held at Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., March 30–September 3, 1984; American Craft Museum II, New York, November 16, 1984–January 12, 1985; Brunnier Gallery and Museum, Iowa State University, Ames, February 10–April 7, 1985; High Museum of Art, April–June 1985; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 15–October 30, 1985; and Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine, November 20, 1985–January 5, 1986. Text by Joan Falconer Byrd.

Mint Museum of Craft and Design. Harvey K. Littleton: Reflections, 1946–1994. Charlotte, N.C.: Mint Museum of Craft and Design, 1999. Text by Mary F. Douglas.

Dante Marioni

Klein, Dan. “Dante Marioni.” Neues Glas/New Glass, no. 3 (fall 2001), pp. 28–35.

Oldknow, Tina. Dante Marioni: Blown Glass. New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2000.

Richard Marquis

Frantz, Susanne K. “Marquis at the Caffe Florian.” American Craft 59, no. 1 (February–March 1999), pp. 74–75, ill. Review of 1998 Venice exhibition.

Marquis, Richard Charles. “The Making of Canne and Murrini and Their Use in Blown Glass Forms.” Master’s thesis, University of California, Berkeley, 1972.

Oldknow, Tina. Richard Marquis: Objects. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997. Published on the occasion of a retrospective exhibition at the Seattle Art Museum.

Wichert, Geoffrey. “Preview: A Marquis Milestone.” Glass, no. 68 (fall 1997), pp. 36–43. Review of retrospective exhibition at the Seattle Art Museum.

William Morris

Blonston, Gary. William Morris: Artifacts—Glass. New York: Abbeville Press, 1996.

William Morris: Cinerary Urn Installation. Seattle: Marquand Books, Inc., 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held at the Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia, June 28–August 18, 2002; and American Craft Museum, New York, January 17–June 8, 2003. Text by Gary Baker.

Yood, James, and Tina Oldknow. William Morris: Animal/Artifact. New York: Abbeville Press, 2000.

Jay Musler

The Boat Show: Fantastic Vessels, Fictional Voyages. [Portland, Maine: Portland Museum of Art], 1990. Catalogue for the exhibition organized by the Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; traveled to Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine, August 21–October 28, 1990. Includes glass works by Jay Musler, Robert Shay, and Bertil Vallien.

Marx-Saunders Gallery. Jay Musler and the Nature of Disquiet. Chicago: Marx-Saunders Gallery, 1998. Catalogue for the exhibition held October 9–November 2, 1998. Text by Bruce W. Pepich.

———. Jay Musler: Visions. Chicago: Marx-Saunders Gallery, 2001. Catalogue for the exhibition held April 20–May 22, 2001. Text by James Yood.

Tom Patti

Heller Gallery. Tom Patti—Glass: A Spatial Boundary, Large and Small Works, 1981–2001. New York: Heller Gallery, 2001. Catalogue for the exhibition held September 8–30, 2001.

Holsten Galleries. Five Masters of Contemporary Glass. Stockbridge, Mass.: Holsten Galleries, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held in spring 2002. Includes works by Dale Chihuly, Marvin Lipofsky, William Morris, Tom Patti, and Lino Tagliapietra.

Ginny Ruffner

Meyerson and Nowinski Art Associates. Ginny Ruffner: Venice Works, 1989. Seattle: Meyerson and Nowinski Art Associates, 1997. Catalogue for the exhibition held December 5, 1996–January 5, 1997. Text by Tina Oldknow.

Miller, Bonnie J. Why Not?: The Art of Ginny Ruffner. Tacoma, Wash.: Tacoma Art Museum; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1995. Published concurrently with the exhibition Garden of Delights curated by Barbara Johns and organized by the Tacoma Art Museum, December 15, 1995–March 24, 1996. Text by Arthur C. Danto.

Laura de Santillana

Barry Friedman Ltd. New Traditions in Glass from Venice: Christiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira, Laura de Santillana. New York: Barry Friedman Ltd., 1998. Catalogue for the exhibition held October 29–December 5, 1998. Texts by Rosa Barovier Mentasti and Susanne Frantz.

Dorigato, Attilia, ed. Laura de Santillana: Works. Venice: Musei Civici Veneziani; Milan: Silvana Editoriale [distributor], c. 2001. Catalogue for the exhibition at Musei Civici Veneziani, Venice. Texts by Janet Koplos, Attilia Dorigato, and Tina Oldknow. Text in English and Italian.

Judith Schaechter

The Rhode Island Connection: Fifteen Contemporary Glass Masters. Newport, R.I.: Newport Art Museum, 1993. Catalogue for the exhibition curated by Virginia Lynch held July 31–September 19, 1993. Text by Ronald J. Onorato.

Tannenbaum, Judith. Judith Schaechter: Heart Attacks. Philadelphia: Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 1995. Catalogue for the exhibition held February 3–April 16, 1995. Texts by Rick Moody and Maria Porges.

Anna Skibska

Anna Skibska at Bullseye Glass. Portland, Ore.: Bullseye Glass Co., 1999. Published in conjunction with the artist’s residency at Bullseye Glass. Texts by Lloyd Herman and Susanne Frantz.

Radzicka, Jolanta Kruszyna, ed. Anna Skibska. [Poland: n.p., 1997]. Chiefly illustrations; biographical and caption information in Polish and English.

Paul Stankard

Bergstrom-Mahler Museum. Paul J. Stankard, Poetry in Glass: A 20-Year Retrospective. Neenah, Wis.: Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, 1990. Catalogue for the exhibition held May 6–September 9, 1990.

Dietz, Ulysses G. Paul Stankard: Homage to Nature. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1996.

Marx-Saunders Gallery. Paul J. Stankard. Chicago: Marx-Saunders Gallery, 2001. Text by James Yood.

Therman Statom

Maurine Littleton Gallery. Therman Statom. Washington, D.C.: Maurine Littleton Gallery, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held April 23–May 15, 2002.

Tampa Museum of Art. River Myth: An Installation by Therman Statom for the Tampa Museum of Art. Tampa, Fla.: Tampa Museum of Art, 2002. Catalogue for the exhibition held January 17–April 7, 2002.

Toledo Museum of Art. Art to Art: Albert Paley, Jim Dine, Therman Statom Respond to Toledo’s Treasures. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1996. Catalogue for the exhibition held March 17–June 19, 1996.

Lino Tagliapietra

Barovier, Marino, ed. Tagliapietra: A Venetian Glass. Dublin: Vitrum, c. 1998. Texts by Thomas S. Buechner and Susanne Frantz.

Sarpellon, Giovanni. Lino Tagliapietra: vetri/Glass/verres/Glas. Venice: Arsenale, c. 1994. Text in Italian, English, French, and German.

William Traver Gallery. Lino Tagliapietra, “La ballata del vetro soffiato”: An Exhibition Marking the Italian Maestro’s Achievement in the World of Studio Glass. Seattle: William Traver Gallery, 2002. Text by Daniel Kany.

Fred Tschida

Tschida, Fred. “Artist Presentations.” The Glass Art Society Journal (1997), p. 63, ill.

“‘Vessels’ Show Offers Toast to Art of Drink.” Antiques and the Arts Weekly 18, no. 51 (December 1990), p. 24. Review of American Craft Museum exhibition including glass works by Fred Tschida and William Bernstein.

Warmus, William. “Everyone Will Be Illuminated for 15 Minutes: Tschida Stories.” Glass, no. 62 (spring 1996), pp. 28–35.

Bertil Vallien

Bertil Vallien. [Kosta, Sweden]: Kosta Boda, [2001]. Catalogue for an exhibition curated by Börge Kamras; text by Gunnar Lindqvist. Text in Swedish and English.

Kangas, Matthew. Bertil Vallien: Somna/rVakna. Seattle: University of Washington Press; Chesham: Combined Academic, 2002. 

Lindqvist, Gunnar. Bertil Vallien. Rev. ed. Trans. Angela Adegren. Stockholm: Carlssons, 1994. Text in Swedish and English.

———. Bertil Vallien: glas äter ljus/i+Glass Eats Light. Trans. Angela Adegren. Stockholm: Carlssons, 1999.

František Vízner

Holesovsky, Karel. Sklo, 1962–1982: František Vízner. Brno, Czechoslovakia: Moravská Galerie, 1983. Catalogue for the exhibition held at Moravská Galerie, Brno, and three other locations. Summary in English and Russian.

Petrová, Sylvá. “Nekolik poznámek k tvorbe Frantiska Víznera.” Bulletin Moravské Galerie v Brne, no. 53 (1997), pp. 161–63, ill. English summary.

Warmus, William. František Vízner: Sklo/Glass, 1951–2001. New York: Barry Friedman Ltd., 2001.

Janusz Walentynowicz

Art of Janusz Walentynowicz. Chicago: n.p., 1996. Catalogue for the exhibition at the Polish Museum of America, Chicago, May 3–17, 1996. Marx-Saunders Gallery and Riley/Hawk Galleries were also involved in the exhibition’s organization.

Marx-Saunders Gallery. Janusz Walentynowicz. Chicago: Marx-Saunders Gallery, 1999. Catalogue for the exhibition held July 9–August 31, 1999. Text by James Yood.

Steven Weinberg

Habatat Galleries. Carlson/Weinberg. Boca Raton, Fla.: Habatat Galleries, 1990.

Marx-Saunders Gallery. Strong Currents: Steven Weinberg. Chicago: Marx-Saunders Gallery, 2000. Catalogue for the exhibition held March 24–April 24, 2000. Text by John Brunetti.

Salon International de la Sculpture. Steven Weinberg. Delle, France: Salon International de la Sculpture, 2000. Texts by John Brunetti and Serge Lechaczynski.

Toots Zynsky

Stedelijk Museum. Toots Zynsky: Tierra del Fuego Series. Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1989. Catalogue for the exhibition held May 20–June 30, 1989. Text by Dan Klein. Text in English, Dutch, and German.

Tognon, Paola. “Capelli di vetro/Glass Hair.” Vetro 4, no. 11 (April–June 2001), pp. 18–22, ill. Text in Italian and English.

 

 

 

 

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